YouTube Episode 0044 – The Temporary and Permanent Disability Retirement Lists


“Jackpot! I’ve Been Offered a HUGE Severance Payment.” DJ says, “Don’t Take It.”

Hello, from Fort Knox.

 

This week I’m going to talk about disability severance pay.  Once you have completed all of your medical boards and received a disability rating from your branch of service and that rating is 20% or less, you are offered a severance payment and a discharge.

 

Should you accept this payment and the discharge?  Well, I did mention last week that you had the options.  Also, the title of this article does say, “Don’t take it.”  Sometimes accepting the money is the only real option you have available to you.  Many times, though, there are other factors to consider.  I’ll describe those options shortly.

 

Let’s first talk about how severance payments are computed.  I like to talk about money, if you haven’t noticed throughout these articles.  Please also remember that you are only offered severance if you have a 20% or lower disability rating from your branch of service (BOS).  The rating you have from the Veterans Administration is totally separate and does not count as part of the consideration for severance.  Once you are offered your BOS rating, here is what happens.

 

Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) will compute your severance using the following formula.  Take two months of your active duty base pay and multiply it by your number of equivalent active duty years. What is equivalent active duty?  Very simple.  It is just your total retirement points divided by three hundred sixty.  The minimum number of years for the purpose of this calculation is six years for combat-related injuries and three years for other injuries.  The maximum number of active duty years is nineteen.

 

For you algebra folks out there, the formula would look like this.

 

(Active duty base pay X 2) X (Retirement Points ÷ 360) =  Severance Pay

 

Remember in previous articles when I talked about VA offsets to drill pay or retired pay?  The same applies here.  VA compensation will be applied against the amount of the severance.  You will also have to face the taxman at the end.

 

If you are receiving a severance for a combat-related injury and also receiving VA compensation for that same injury, it is possible to exclude the severance pay from taxation (at least on the federal level).  The is the result of what is called the “St Clair Decision” in 1991.  In order to take advantage of this exclusion and if you’re still in the current tax year, send your PEB findings and VA decision letter to DFAS.  They will compare those documents and determine whether the injuries are the same.  If you received a severance in a previous tax year, send those same documents to the IRS.  I would recommend going to a local office rather than trying to do it over the phone and by mail.

 

Back to taking a severance.

 

As you can imagine, the amounts of these severance payments can be substantial (tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars).  It would only be natural for someone to be tempted when this sort of money is offered to them. If you take the money, though, you will lose a great many benefits which you have probably earned.

 

The key word in severance is sever (for those English enthusiasts out there) and that is exactly what happens when you accept this payment.  You have been severed from military service.  It’s like hitting the delete key on a computer.  Your service is gone.  You have no retirement benefits, no VA compensation, no Tricare, nothing.  You have been bought out.  Have a nice day.

 

But, D.J., you can recover a deleted file. Is there a way to recover “deleted” service?

As with so many things, it depends.  Let’s say you are eligible for VA compensation or wish to get medical assistance from the VA.  They will provide such compensation and assistance (dramatic pause goes here) after you have repaid the severance pay.  If you’re going to receive VA compensation, the VA will withhold that compensation until sufficient time has passed to recoup all of the severance. This can be several years.

 

If you’re trying to recover military retirement benefits, the same recoupment rule would apply (another dramatic pause) if the branch of service will allow you to do this.

 

If you have earned any sort of lasting benefit from military service (particularly financial payments), it may be a good idea to consider refusing severance pay.  This is particularly true if you have fifteen or more years of military service (and you’re currently a reservist).  If this is you then you can request transfer to the Retired Reserve.  At least this way you would still be eligible for retired pay at age sixty and have Tricare benefits.  Of course, you will need to figure out the best choice for your situation.

 

That is all for this week.

 

 

Thanks for joining me today and, of course, thank you for your service.

 

D.J.

Resources:
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/plan/separation-payments/disability-severance-pay.html
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/manage/taxes/isittaxable.html
St. Clair Decision Information Letter


YouTube Bonus Episode 001 – Interview With a PEBLO

https://youtu.be/KZKGHT60gYQ


Podcast Bonus Episode 001 Interview With a PEBLO


Podcast Episode 0041 – “Jackpot! I’ve Been Offered a HUGE Severance Payment.” DJ says, “Don’t Take It.”

Resources:
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/plan/separation-payments/disability-severance-pay.html
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/manage/taxes/isittaxable.html
St. Clair Decision Information Letter


YouTube Episode 0043 – “Jackpot! I’ve Been Offered a HUGE Severance Payment.” DJ says, “Don’t Take It.”

https://youtu.be/_MEZ8GTt8fo

Resources:
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/plan/separation-payments/disability-severance-pay.html
https://www.dfas.mil/retiredmilitary/manage/taxes/isittaxable.html
St. Clair Decision Information Letter


Beware the IDES of Medical Boards…?

This week we’re going to talk about a very confusing topic.  For this reason, I’m going to break this into several pieces so it’s – hopefully – easier to understand.  I’m going to talk about the Integrated Disability Evaluation System or, at least as we call it in the Army, IDES (pronounced eye-dez).

By the way, don’t be afraid of the title of this article.  I chose that name simply as a play on “Beware the ides of March” from Richard Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.  You shouldn’t be afraid of IDES and medical boards.  You should understand it and know how to use it to benefit you.  I hope to help you do this.

I will confess to a bit of insider knowledge on a lot of what I’m about to mention because I’m currently going through IDES myself.  Anyway, IDES is the series of medical boards you go through when you have medical problems which just won’t heal (like for more than twelve months).  Of course, the military would like for you to recover and continue to be an asset.  If this just isn’t going to happen, these medical boards may be the best option for you.  Don’t be afraid of them.  Even though separation and / or retirement is a possibility, there is still the chance of being determined to be fit for duty and continuing service.  If this continued service is not what happens for you, there are other ways to continue service if you choose to do so.

Let’s describe what happens when you start the down the path of the Integrated Disability Evaluation System.  First of all, integrated what?  Very simple.  IDES is a joint evaluation by both your branch of service and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  This means you walk away with disability ratings from both agencies when you are finished.  These ratings are independent of each other; by that I mean each agency has its own standards for determining a rating.

As an example of what I mean by independent standards, your branch of service is concerned about the medical issues which inhibit you from performing your military duties and whether or not the injuries were caused by your military service.  Let’s say you’re an infantryman who has back issues which make it very painful for you to wear a rucksack and conduct a road march.  This would be quite a problem for an infantryman but might not be as important if you’re an office worker.  The VA would rate your disability either way but your branch of service (BOS) will only look at whether or not you can still do your job (including fitness tests and height / weight standards, of course).  The ratings from these two agencies can vary considerably as a result.  Just a while ago, in fact, I had one person talking to me who had a forty percent rating from the Army but a ninety percent rating from the VA.

Treatment and Referral
Anyway, you have at this point suffered through your medical issues and finally informed your BOS of them.  The BOS has conducted what is called a fit-for-duty board and determined that you are unfit for continued service.  You will receive at this point a letter called a Medical Retention Decision Point (MRDP) memo.  This letter will inform you of your status and give you three options.  Those options are:

  1. Separation from the military.
  2. Retirement or transfer to the Retired Reserve (if eligible).
  3. Requesting evaluation by IDES.

You will then have a set amount of time to make a choice from the options shown above.

 

But, DJ, what is the best choice for me?

This is something only you can determine.  Naturally, you can seek advice from retirement services officers and other professionals but you will ultimate have to be the one to decide.  In my experience, many service members have benefitted from going through IDES. There have been just as many whose injuries were not duty-related (not caused by military service) and would not benefit from IDES at all.

Claim Development

Now you have chosen to dive into IDES.  You should request this through your chain of command and begin to prepare by requesting all of your medical records.  When I say all, I do mean ALL of them and from all sources.  Since the VA is going to look at everything you give them, it is best to have it readily available.  Your BOS will want to see just those records which pertain to your service-connected injuries.  You may need to hand carry your records to your first meeting with your case manager.

Everyone is assigned a case manager called a Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Officer (PEBLO).  This person is the link between you, your commander, and the IDES. Your PEBLO will be responsible for the military side of things and will counsel you on expectations and benefits as you travel down this path.  You will also be assigned a Military Service Coordinator (MSC) who will be responsible for the VA side of things (more on him in a moment).

Note: I recommend verifying what you are told by a PEBLO with a retirement services officer.  In my experience, PEBLOs have given “hit-or-miss” advice to service members.  This is not to bash them.  Often they are active duty-centric and as a result of their lacking sufficient experience with reserve component members end up giving them mediocre or even incorrect advice.  MSCs can have this same problem (such as the one who spoke with me; it was obvious he was talking from an active duty standpoint and counsel which would be correct for someone on active duty but incorrect for a reservist).  Again, I’m not trying to flame these people.  I’m just telling you to seek additional information.

Your PEBLO will give you an initial counseling of what to expect from IDES and assist you in completing a list of all medical issues which limit or prevent you from completing your military duties.  You will then be referred to your Military Service Coordinator.  By the way, neither of these people are employees of the IDES.  They are employees of the Military Treatment Facility (in the case of the PEBLO) and the VA (for the MSC).

The MSC will talk to you about the VA examinations and will compile a list of ALL of the issues you may have (or wish to claim) which have been caused by or exacerbated by your service.  Your PEBLO and MSC will then coordinate all of the specialist examinations you will need for the next phase of IDES.

Medical Evaluation

You will now be evaluated by physicians and specialists to determine the extent of your injuries (this includes mental conditions, such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, as well). You are expected to make all of your appointments without fail.  Your chain of command will be notified if you do not show up to an appointment.

Expect this phase to take a month or two to complete.  Don’t get frustrated by the timeline.  Also remember that results of these exams will be provided to both your BOS and to the VA for independent ratings evaluation.

Medical Evaluation Board

Your documentation and exam results will now be reviewed by at least two physicians who will determine if you are fit to return to duty or if you do not meet medical retention standards.  If you do not, you will be referred to the next stage, the Physical Evaluation Board.

The Informal Physical Evaluation Board

This panel is made up of a three-member board of officers and civilians (often with military experience) and a civilian physician. PEBs involving reservists will have a reserve component member on the board.  The PEB will develop written justification supporting each injury you have sustained as far as whether it is preventing you from performing your military duties and whether it was sustained in a combat zone (which is important in a variety of ways).  If your conditions existed prior to your military service, they will also determine whether it was exacerbated (made worse) by your service.  They will decide whether the condition is permanent or temporary.  Lastly, they will determine whether a disability rating is warranted for that injury.

Remember that IDES is a performance-based review.  It is concerned with your ability to do your job and not – as is so often said by barracks lawyers – whether you are deployable or not (though that could be a factor for some specialties like infantry).

The Combined Disability Rating

At the end of this evaluation, the PEB will determine your combined disability rating.  What is this, you may ask?  It is the total amount of disability based on your injuries.  This is not simply adding up your ratings, though.  For example, if you have three ratings, 50%, another 50%, and 30%, you do not have a combined rating of 130 percent.  How does a combined rating work, then?  Look at this (and this description applies to both the DOD and the VA).

First, assume you originally had a 100% capable body. Now take your highest rating (in this case, either of the 50% ratings) and subtract it from the 100% capable body.  You now have 50% of a “good body” left.  Now take the next rating (50% again, in this case) and apply it to what is left over.  Fifty percent of a 50% capable body is 25 percent.  This leaves a 25% capable body remaining.  We now apply the lowest rating (30%) to the 25% capable body. Thirty percent of 25% is 7.5 percent.  This is subtracted from the remaining 25% and leaves us with 17.5% of a capable body left or, to put it more simply, an 82.5% disability rating.  This rating is then rounded to the nearest ten percent (in this case, 80%) and gives us our final disability rating.

If that doesn’t make sense to you at first, try rereading that last paragraph.  I will also include a visual description of this in the Resources section of this article.  It usually helps people understand the math a little better.

Transition Phase

You now have a final combined disability rating.  If that rating is less than 30% and you have less than twenty qualifying years of service (remember we’re just talking about reservists here) then you will be offered a severance package (two months of base pay times your years of equivalent active duty service (retirement points divided by 360)) and separated from service.  If you have a 30% rating or higher, you will be medically retired and begin receiving retired pay and benefits immediately.

Remember last week when I said not to be afraid of medical disqualification if you have at least fifteen qualifying years of service?  This is one of the time in which this fact becomes very important.  If you have a rating of less than 30% and have at least fifteen qualifying years, you should not accept the severance when it is offered.  You should refuse it and request transfer to the Retired Reserve.  Your branch of service will be notified of your disqualification and years of service and will then issue you an early notice of eligibility (NOE) for retired pay (which has the same effect as if you had twenty years of service and received a twenty-year letter).  Often, we call this early NOE a fifteen-year letter (even if you have sixteen or even nineteen years of service).  The fifteen-year letter will prove your eligibility for retired pay and benefits at age sixty (or earlier if you have qualifying active duty service).  If you take the severance pay (and I’ll go deeper into this topic in another article) then you lose all of the benefits you have earned.  If you have medical issues, please either get fixed or go through IDES and retire.  It’s the best thing over continuing to hurt yourself through the ardors of military service.

If you disagree with the findings of the MEB or PEB, you do have the right to appeal.  Don’t think you are without options.  There is an entire section of military lawyers who specialize in assisting soldiers going through IDES.  Use them if you think you need them.

So how long does all of this actually take?  The goal for reservists is 305 days; the goal for active duty soldiers is 295 days.  Every case is different though so this can be longer or shorter based on your circumstances.

There is one more option available to you.  If you wish to only be evaluated by the military (and not by the VA), you can choose to go through the Legacy Disability Evaluation System or LDES (pronounced El-Dez).  This can be a much shorter evaluation but it can also reduce the total benefits for which you may be eligible.  Keep that in mind as you make your decision.

I have greatly simplified things in this article (and it’s still very long).  I will go into other factors as this series progresses.

If you think this information is useful, please share it with others.  I also would be interested in your comments (good and bad) and questions.  The more I hear from you, the better I can make these articles and other content.

Thanks for joining me today and, of course, thank you for your service.

D.J.

References:

Related YouTube Episodes:
The Basics of Reserve Retirement
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Podcast Episodes:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Articles:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?


Podcast Episode 0040 – Beware the IDES of Medical Boards…?

References:

Related YouTube Episodes:
The Basics of Reserve Retirement
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Podcast Episodes:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Articles:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?


YouTube Episode 0042 – Beware the IDES of Medical Boards…?

https://youtu.be/a3xBL0Th3vc

References:

 

Related YouTube Episodes:
The Basics of Reserve Retirement
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Podcast Episodes:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
Final Pay vs High-3
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

Related Articles:
Help, I Need My Records. Where is My DD 214?
Should I Take Drill Pay or VA Compensation?
How to Read an Army National Guard Retirement Points Statement
How to Read an Army Reserve Points Statement
How to Read an Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard Points Statement
How to Read a Navy Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Marine Corps Reserve Points Statement
How to Read a Coast Guard Reserve Points Statement
I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?


I’m Medically Unfit for Retention. Now What?

So, you’re finally to the point that you can’t hide your medical problems from your unit anymore (yes, people actually do this, sad to say).  A fit for duty board has reviewed your issues and has determined that you’re unfit for continued service in the military.  “Great,” you say. “I don’t have twenty years yet.  I’ve just lost all of the retirement benefits I’ve been trying to earn.”

Am I right?  Is this what’s going through your mind?  Well, there is still hope.  Do you have at least fifteen years of qualifying service yet?  If the answer is yes then you haven’t lost anything.  Here’s how things actually work.

As I’ve already implied, there is a vesting point (a point at which you have earned something through your service which cannot be taken away) before you reach the twenty-year mark.  If you have at least fifteen “good years” by the time you are found to be unfit for continued service and awaiting discharge, you can receive an early notice of eligibility for retired pay (in the National Guard, we call this a “fifteen-year letter”) and still receive retirement benefits at age sixty (or earlier if you have qualifying active duty time).

This fact has come as quite a surprise to a great many reservists who thought they had lost everything.  For example, just two weeks ago, I was giving a class to a group of Army Reserve soldiers and mentioned this little tidbit of information.  I noticed a great deal of increased electricity in the room and took a moment to scan the audience.  I then asked if this applied to anyone in the room (of course, I said they didn’t have to acknowledge me if it did).  No one made it plainly obvious by raising their hands, but I saw several heads nodding.  That was enough, though, to get several of them to ask additional questions which is exactly what I wanted.

One of them asked, “Why is it called a fifteen-year letter?  I have seventeen years of service.”  The answer, simply put, is it’s just a term we use based on the fact the service member has at least fifteen qualifying years, the minimum needed to get this notice of eligibility published early.

“How is pay calculated if you get one of these letters?” another inquired.  “Is pay prorated as if you did complete twenty years?”  No, I replied, it is not prorated but it is based on the total number of retirement points you have earned at the time you are discharged.  Other than the obviously lower number of points used to calculate pay, though, most of the other retirement benefits are exactly the same as if you had completed twenty years.  The only exception would be for concurrent disability and retirement pay (or CRDP, I’ll cover that in a later article in this series on medical retirements) for which the member would not qualify.

“Do the medical problems have to be in the line of duty?” asked someone else.  No, they do not.  You could get injured in while coming back from the grocery store or working around the house.  As long as the medical problem is not due to negligence or misconduct (such as drunk driving), it does not matter what caused it.  The primary factors are medical disqualification and fifteen years of qualifying service (remember you need fifty points per year for that time to count for retirement purposes).

After a few other questions which I don’t recall, it was obvious this fact came as quite a relief to these selected soldiers.  I asked how many of them were concerned about losing their retirements.  At this point, several people in the room raised their hands … even some who had not nodded their heads earlier.  Since such a worry is common in the National Guard, I was not surprised to see it was present in the USAR, as well.

So, what does all of this mean to you if you’re having medical issues.  It means, dear reader, if you have at least fifteen good years and want to travel this path then stop trying to push through the pain and present your medical problems to your unit.  They will send your medical documents through channels and, at some point, your records will be reviewed by a fit for duty board (you may be asked to go to your primary physician or a military doctor during this review).

If the board determines you no longer meet the medical retention standards then you will be recommended for discharge.  At this point, your service will generate the fifteen-year notice of eligibility.  When you receive this letter, remember to make a reserve component survivor benefit election (just as if you had received a twenty-year letter).  You will have ninety days from the time you receive the letter to make this choice.  Be sure to read my other articles on the survivor benefit plan to learn more about how SBP works.

Be sure to request transfer to the retired reserve and not to be completely separated from the military.  Your branch of service should know to do this but some (like the Army Reserve) will only do this if you request it (otherwise they’ll discharge you completely from service).  Once you have your transfer orders, you will be good to go until retirement age.

Has this helped you to better understand the options available to you?  I hope so.  If not, please be sure to comment below or send me an email with your questions.  Of course, comments are welcome even if you do not have questions.

If you think this information would be useful to someone you know then please be sure to share this article with that person.  Let’s get this into everyone’s head so they can make informed decisions.  As the cliché says, knowledge is power.

Thanks for being part of this audience today and, of course, thank you for your service.

D.J.

References:
10 USC 12731: Age and service requirements
10 USC 12731b: Special rule for members with physical disabilities not incurred in line of duty

Related YouTube Episodes:
YouTube Episode 0003 – The Basics of Reserve Retirement
YouTube Episode 0004 – The Notice of Eligibility for Retired Pay (Twenty-Year Letter)
YouTube Episode 0005 – The Basics of the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan (RCSBP)
YouTube Episode 0006 – The Basics of the Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP)
YouTube Episode 0009 – So, What is This Reduced Retirement Age Thing Anyway?
YouTube Episode 0014 – Calculating Retired Pay Under the Current (Legacy) Retirement Plan

Related Podcast Episodes:
Podcast Episode 0002 – The Notice of Eligibility for Retired Pay (Twenty-Year Letter)
Podcast Episode 0003 – The Basics of the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan (RCSBP)
Podcast Episode 0004 – The Basics of the Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP)
Podcast Episode 0007 – So, What is This Reduced Retirement Age Thing Anyway?
Podcast Episode 0012 – Calculating Retired Pay Under the Current (Legacy) Retirement Plan

Related Articles:
The Basics of the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan (RCSBP)
When Do I Make an Election for the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
How Much Will the RCSBP Pay to My Beneficiaries and What Will It Cost Me?
Should I Buy a Life Insurance Policy Instead of Choosing the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
What Are the Coverage Options for the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
Who Can Be Beneficiaries of the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
How Do I Enroll in the Reserve Component Survivor Benefit Plan?
The Basics of the Survivor Benefit Plan
How Do I Enroll in the Survivor Benefit Plan?
Should I Pay for SBP or Buy a Life Insurance Policy?
Calculating Retired Pay Under the Current (Legacy) Retirement Plan
The Notice of Eligibility for Retired Pay (Twenty-Year Letter)